Another Broken Leg??

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What are the odds? A dog came into MCASAC in January with a broken leg (Dumpling), then another arrived in February (Sunflower). Now it’s March, and yet another young dog arrived with a broken leg. Meet Lexi, a 10-month-old German Shepherd mix. She came to MCASAC as a stray and she has a very nasty break to her hind leg. The veterinarians at MCASAC are hoping that it can be repaired but there’s a possibility that her leg may need to be amputated. We at MCPAW believe that no animal will go unserved, and we’re sure you agree with us. We have approved payment for her surgery, no matter what it will entail and the cost. A young girl like Lexi will recover and have a long life in front of her. We are dedicated to make that happen for her.

We are hoping that this trend of dogs arriving at MCASAC with broken legs stops here.

MCPAW thanks you for being our partners and supporters to ensure that the homeless pets at MCASAC are treated like they are our own – only the best care will do.

Thank you for your continued caring. Donate online to help Lexi.

And One More...

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Just last month, we told you about Dumpling, a dog who came into MCASAC with a broken leg after getting hit by a car. Well here we go again…. Poor Sunflower also was a stray who has arrived at MCASAC with a broken front leg after a suspected run in with a car. MCPAW has agreed to fund the surgery to have the leg repaired. Sunflower is young, less than a year old, and deserves this chance to live a painfree, happy life. We need over $1,500 to pay for the surgery, but we have already authorized MCASAC to move forward with the surgery. Won’t you consider donating to help us raise the funds? Please go to our donation page: http://www.mcpaw.org/take-action-1

Help a Dog in Need

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MCPAW has made a pledge to MCASAC that no animal in need will go without care. So when we heard about Dumpling, of course MCPAW jumped right into action! Dumpling arrived at MCASAC as a stray who appeared to have been hit by a car. Luckily, his injuries were not severe but the veterinary examination uncovered serious hip problems. Since Dumpling is still young, only about 5 years old, and very, very sweet, we agreed that corrective surgery must be done immediately for Dumpling. Dumpling had the surgery and is now recovering with physical therapy, but the cost was more than we expected - $2,050.

Who can say no to this face?! Please donate for his care: http://www.mcpaw.org/take-action-1

Girls Scout Troop Writes Letter

MCPAW is pleased to post the following article written by Katie H of Girl Scout Troop 5211! We will also be sharing several informational posters that they created as well. Thanks for caring about the animals!

Helping the People and Pets of The Community: Animal Shelters!

Finding animals their forever homes is the long-term goal of all animal shelters, but it’s not always so easy. Shelters can face many issues which can impact the community if not fixed! That's why volunteers and adoptions are so key to keeping a shelter, continuing their work in life-saving efforts. One of the biggest issues they face is overcrowding, the strain of overcrowding in shelter environments drain their organizational resources which are needed to provide proper and standard care to all pets at the shelter.

Donations help to ease funding issues and provide the necessary supplies animals at the shelter need. If you don’t have the time to donate something physical, shelters also receive monetary donations as well. Promoting the shelter and spreading the message of animal protection and care is another great way to help, along with volunteering and donating. Volunteering your time is a "donation in kind" each hour you can give is dollar value! In fact, the current volunteerism rate in Maryland is over 27 dollars! So if you volunteer 10 hours, that equates to (approx.) 270 dollars of a donation "in kind"! Volunteering helps just as much as money or donations! Shelters are necessary for our communities and society as a whole because they work to protect pets of irresponsible owners. Owners who abuse and mistreat animals tend to raise aggressive and scared animals and later abandon them. Luckily shelters find strays and help them find new homes. Shelters speak up for animals who can’t speak themselves, they advocate for animal care and give all pets the medical attention, shelter, food, water, entertainment, and love they need.

Shelters aren’t just helping animals, they also provide amazing services for the local community. Shelters hold tours for groups like schools and troops, as well as educate groups about a shelter’s role in the community and the programs they have to offer. A huge service the shelter provide is Field and Animal Service Officers. Animal Service Officers take calls dealing with animal abuse and neglect, stray or rabid animals, as well as sick and injured wildlife. They work and respond to various animal emergencies every day, keeping animals and the people of the community safe. That’s why it’s so important that all members of our community help support the shelter and all the services they provide.

My girl scout troop and I wanted to give back to our local shelter so we collected donations and put up posters around various community buildings and local stores. We even wrote this article to educate others about animal shelters and why they need and deserve our support as a community. We hope that this will help you consider adopting or volunteering at a shelter sometime soon, because just sending a few donations or spending a few hours can make all the difference in helping a pup find a loving, forever home.

Let's Help Little Athy!

There are so many heartbreaking stories of pets losing their homes, but senior pets seem to be among the saddest of the stories. Often, the pets have health issues that their owners can’t afford to address. That’s what happened with poor little Athy who was recently surrendered to MCASAC. He’s an 11-year-old Maltese who suffers from a very large perineal hernia, where the internal organs can slip out of the abdomen. Fortunately, surgery can repair the problem and the dog can go on to live a normal life with no complications. MCPAW has agreed to fund his surgery and we’re looking for your help to defray the $1100 cost. Won’t you consider donating to help little Athy get healthy again? http://www.mcpaw.org/take-action-1/

Combined Federal Campaign

For the past two years, MCPAW has been fortunate to participate in the Combined Federal Campaign in the National Capital Area. That means federal employees can select MCPAW for workplace giving. This year, the theme of the campaign is Show Some Love. We are expanding that theme to be "Show Some Love...for Homeless Pets." We encourage everyone who is a federal employee or knows someone who is, to pledge to MCPAW. Our CFC number is 69792. Thank you for your support!

A Cat in Need

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Meet Safari, a neutered male buff-colored cat who came into the Montgomery County Animal Services & Adoption Center as a stray. We believe he is about 3-5 years old. Isn't he gorgeous? Sadly, this handsome boy has a very bad fracture in one of his rear legs, and he is in a great deal of pain. He has already seen a surgeon and the leg cannot be saved. It must be amputated. MCPAW has agreed to pay for his surgery. We estimate the cost to be about $1200. Safari is worth it. Don't you think so too? All donations would be appreciated and will go directly to MCPAW's Veterinary Medical Fund for Safari.Thank you for helping us help the animals! http://www.mcpaw.org/take-action-1/

Adoption Fee Sponsored!

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Some pets just touch our hearts more than others. That's what happened when one of MCPAW's supporters saw Hickory and his story. If you recall, Hickory came into MCASAC with a terrible problem - he could not urinate. MCASAC's veterinarian examined him and found a blockage. Thanks to MCPAW's generous donors, we were able to fund the surgery to repair the blockage. He's recovered and doing great! But Hickory is still waiting to find a home to love him.  Hickory is one lucky dog, someone fell in love with his sweet face and donated his adoption fee. How can you resist him? Please consider adopting Hickory.

Helping a Cat with Diabetes-Related Eye Issues

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It's not just humans who can develop diabetes. Our companion pets can have it too, and it's more common than most people realize. That's what happened to poor Callie the cat. She came into MCASAC as an owner surrender with no reason why they didn't want her. The veterinary exam discovered that she had diabetes, and also was having diabetes-related issues with her eyes. One eye needed to be immediately removed. At just 5 years old, Callie has a long life to live.

In hopes of saving the other eye, MCASAC has asked MCPAW to help pay for Callie's visit and treatment by a veterinary ophthalmologist. Of course, we could not say no!! Will you pitch in to help us to ensure she gets all of the best treatment as possible? 

Callie had beautiful green eyes before she got sick. Let's give this still-young, always beautiful girl a better chance at retaining her remaining sight. Thank you for caring! GIVE NOW FOR CALLIE 

It May Be a New Year But...

...the animals keep on coming in who need our help. A new year is meaningless to an animal in need. 

And so it continues. MCPAW received word of a dog at the Montgomery County Animal Services & Adoption Center named Hickory. A young Boxer mix, Hickory came in as a stray with unknown history. It was immediately noted that he was having trouble urinating. Upon exam, it appears he may have had some sort of trauma that caused a testicular adhesion and a urethral stricture. The adhesion was repaired when he was neutered but he requires further surgery to relieve the urethral stricture. What is recommended is a scrotal urethrostomy. Sounds terrible, poor guy! But it can't be worse than not being able to urinate.

MCPAW wants to help Hickory get this needed surgery. Can we count on you to help us help him? All donations from now until January 31 will go into MCPAW's Veterinary Medical Fund for Hickory's surgery. Go to www.mcpaw.org/take-action-1 to donate. Thank you for helping Hickory!